Baked Makeup

We currently produced pressed powder makeup - but I am curious to explore baked makeup - like in the following video. 

Does anyone have any advice on where to start with formulation and equipment for this type of product? 


Comments

  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    They actually gave away virtually their entire process in that video. I'm really kind of surprised. Also, more than a few laughs at the beginning.

    What scale are you planning to operate on - batch size, etc.? What purpose are you trying to achieve - commercial sale or home crafting?

    Oh, and by the way - "baked makeup"? Most brilliant idea of making a necessary production step into a marketing tool since "micronized pigments".
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • johnbjohnb Member, Professional Chemist
    Bobzchemist

    That's what I thought but, not being particularly familiar with colour cosmetics, I thought I was missing some important point.
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    edited September 2016
    When making powdered makeup, a small amount of oil is needed to act as a binder. The best results are achieved when that oil is spread out evenly throughout the entire batch. The dilemma has always been finding the best way to accomplish those results, since the binder oil wants to absorb strongly on to the powder particles as soon as it contacts them, and too much oil is just as bad for performance as unevenly distributed oil is.

    The traditional way to do this has been to spray the oil onto the batch while it's being stirred in a ribbon blender, and then to pass the powder + oil mixture through a pulverizer several times.

    This is a time-consuming process, as one might imagine.

    What the folks in that video are doing instead is making an emulsion with the binder oils and water, adding the makeup powders until the mixture becomes a paste, extruding then molding that paste, and finally, drying the water off in an oven. The emulsion and stirring the paste mixture insures a perfect distribution of binder oil onto the powder particles. Since water is bad for pressed powder product stability for a number of reasons, the drying (baking) step is critically important. It's brilliant to turn that production step into a marketing tool.

    Interestingly (at  least to me) is that the "baked makeup" process didn't become feasible until it became unacceptable to use parabens in makeup. Prior to that, parabens were the best (and cheapest) preservatives to use in powders, and since they were soluble in water, the water-based process that you see in the video above would have destroyed the preservative system. The cost difference between parabens and oil-soluble preservatives was enough to kill the potential use of this process. Now, since we can't use parabens anyway, that cost consideration has gone away.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • This seems like a great way to mix an active ingredient in a powder mixture. What about if a ingredient is heat sensitive any other suggestions? How hot is the baking process usually. 

    Does water solubility  cause the parabens to evaporate along with the water? So nothing in the mixture can be water soluble? 

    Victoria Yepez 
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Baking process is just hot enough to evaporate water efficiently. Must be determined by trial and error experimentation.

    If you use the process above, you could use any water soluble ingredient, come to think of it, even parabens.

    The typical commercial pressed powder process produces thousands of pieces an hour, or more. The original slurry processes all tried to match that speed, so that the water in the slurry was essentially vacuumed away - and with it went all the parabens and other water soluble ingredients. The costs involved with the slurry process killed this technology for about 20-30 years - until the "baked makeup" process came along. That disk they are putting in below the slurry is the key to solving all the slurry problems we used to have, by the way. Very high tech stuff.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Interesting, thanks for the comments @Bobzchemist !  

    We would produce 1000-5000 units per shade.  It sounds like we will just stick with our regular pressed powdered products and wait for the "baked" trend to pass.  
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