What is happening with my tin eyeshadow pans?

so I noticed this after 24hours had passed. I pressed them with rubbing alcohol, could that be reacting to the metal? What would be a sufficient subistute? 

I have a powder press coming so perhaps I can just dry press with my oil binder? 
http://i63.tinypic.com/14y3fde.jpg

Comments

  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    rust.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    it looks like corrosion

    the rubbing alcohol has most likely attacked the protective air-tight lacquer on the surface of the tin; try using a chemically different binder, e.g. isododecane
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Almost all companies dry press their pressed powders. You also might want to look into using both a dry binder and an oil binder at the same time.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • I figured out what was happened. The arrowroot I use as an additive was absorbing and preventing the full evaporation of the liquid. I made a separate formula for pressing and have since then started dry pressing using oil that's been "cut" (like butter into flour) 
    Grape seed is what I prefer to use because it disperses better. 

    I am super excited to be getting this 1/2 ton powder press this coming week. Dry pressing will be so much easier 
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Dry binders to try include soaps like Aluminum, Calcium, Magnesium, or Zinc Stearate; finely powdered plastics like polyethylene, nylon, teflon or polylactic acid; and "natural" materials like cellulose, silk, or carnauba wax. 
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
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