Herbal Infused Oils

JessicaMoonJessicaMoon Member
edited March 2018 in Hair
Hello:

I am currently working on a hair butter. I would like to incorporate some infused oils such as hibiscus. I see that the most popular method is by heating the flowers in an oil such as coconut oil and straining it. It seems like after that process is done, the infused oil is ready for use.
 However, in my research, I have not seen anything about shelf life or just how safe this is in the long term.. so I am wondering if this is a safe way of infusing the oil to add to other ingredients to make a hair butter. Also, no water is being used so then are any additional preservatives needed aside from what can be found in the aloe vera gel?

I would appreciate the feedback/suggestions!!

Thanks!!

Comments

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Would you be selling the product?

    If so, Infused oils without batch to batch testing for consistency with the lack of proper documentation will be an issue. Eventually, you will need a TDS and MSDS.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • Yes, it would be for sale. Ok like testing in a lab? I’m from a Caribbean country and we don’t have this facilities here. Also, what is a TDS and MSDS?
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    In that case, you would be better off buying standardized extracts. One of the root characteristics of a credible product is that it is consistent from batch to batch. Preservation is based upon a consistent product, especially if you are referencing challenge testing. Botanical products by definition vary due to numerous environmental factors. An MSDS and TDS are basic documents used for Occupational Safety and Analytical standards. As your line grows, some sales outlet or buyer will require you to provide this documentation. The MSDS would be required for shipping, especially through Customs.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • JessicaMoon With all due respects,I think this is beyond your current expertise and resources.Having been involved in similar projects from synthesis through methods development analytical methods.ACS and INCI  name depending on process. scale--up in manufacture, product development, you are biting off more than you can chew.Buy the herbal extracts for Infusion and save yourself considerable time and effort.
  • @Microformulation @DRBOB@VERDIENT.BIZ

    okay, I appreciate the advice. Seeing as though hibiscus grows here, I was trying to incorporate it by trying to infuse it myself and to save on another oil needed to be purchased.

    Also, I don’t know if this needs to be asked in another forum, but honey also appears to be a natural preservative and can be used in combination with oils and butters provided there is no water being used.. which is the case. Can you confirm this?
  • I’m also using aloe vera containing these ingredients:

    Organic aloe vera barbadensis leaf juice (gel), carbomer (thickener), certified organic aloe vera juice (gel) concentrate, organic aloe vera barbadensis leaf polysaccharides (aloesorb), tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E), retinyl palmitate (vitamin A), ascorbic acid (vitamin C), disodium EDTA (preservatives), caprylyl glycol (emollient), phenoxyethanol (preservative), sorbic acid (preservative). 

    As you can see, preservatives are in the store bought aloe Vera gel already. Would any other preservatives be needed then? 
  • If your system is anhydrous you are probably okay;no comment on honey.
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    1. Even though the Hibiscus grows there, it is a false savings as you CAN NOT use it. I have lavender in my front yard. I buy lavender.

    2. Honey is self-preserving, but not a preservative for a product. Honey in its harvested state has very little free water. Dilute it in a water phase and it becomes a food source for contamination.

    3. The preservative in the Aloe preserves the Aloe. They are NOT at a level that will preserve a Formula.

    Please don't take offense, but I have to agree with DRBOB@VERDIENT.BIZ. I believe you could benefit with some further credible education. In my opinion, only, the fact that you are addressing the honey as a preservative leads me to believe that you may be referring to some unreliable online sources.

    Preservation can be tricky. Also, your product seems a bit all over the place. You make a point to use "organic" materials but also use materials that would not be allowed under an Organic or Natural standard.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • Thanks for the feedback
  • @Microformulation:

    > Even though the Hibiscus grows there, it is a false savings as you CAN NOT use it.

    Not withstanding the cost effectiveness argument (which I totally agree on); why would you characterize this as "CAN NOT"?   Trace pesticides?  lack of stabilization of the fragrance?  Or something else (i.e. regulatory, trade certification etc)?

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Regulatory and Documentation. Several times a quarter I get a frantic call from a Cosmetic line that is trying to place their product with a specific company or buyer. They also "over estimated" the marketing advantage of "using our own harvested" raw material. As soon as they deal with the buyer, they get a document like this;



    This documentation comes routinely with a credible wholesale source. If you are using your own undocumented product, you will either have to obtain this testing ($$$ and slow) or switch to a reputable source that does supply these documents. Note, that some of this documentation ($$$) is done each and everytime you harvest and create the raw material not just one time. In the end, the fallacy that "we use our own harvested material" is a false economy. There are so many other more important marketing benchmarks, and this is a distraction. I know this is not an objective and eminently proveable statement, but it is based upon numerous (>25) cases where this mistake was made.

    Also, one of the goals of good manufacturing is a consistent product. In these cases the feedstock (the initial plant material) varies based upon many conditions. One advantage of processed materials is that the presence of the preferred active material is quantified and the final raw material is standardized within a narrow window.

    Can use use it? I suppose. However, it will eventually be a barrier to growth of your line.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • apersonaperson Member
    edited April 2018
    > Regulatory and Documentation.

    Got you. ;)

    > If you are using your own undocumented product....In the end, the fallacy that "we use our own harvested material" is a false economy

    I agree with your overall points with respect to the "false economy", as well as the distraction.  If your primary business is making cosmetics, why would you really want to deal with it, if you don't have to. 

    I was wondering if there was some sort of technical (cosmetics-specific) bar I was not aware of.  can not, implied a finality that left me curious.  Hence the request for clarification.  Nothing more. 

    Thank you for answering.
Sign In or Register to comment.