Can I add royal jelly to a cosmetic formula

andriannavandriannav Member
edited July 2019 in Formulating
I want to add royal jelly to cream ... allowed under cosmetic legislation; at what rate can I add it ?? where can i find information?

Comments

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • smoksmok Member
    edited July 2019

    royal jelly realy is good for 1 thing

    it is good for bees only

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Actually two things...
    it's good for business too.
  • ngarayeva001ngarayeva001 Member
    edited July 2019
    I don’t know about you guy but after I saw this, I came to the conclusion that I want my skincare vegan.


    I mean, don’t get me wrong! With all those wonderful ‘toxic chemicals’ like PEGs, Sulfates,Silicones, Parabens and whatever is demonized now. But very very vegan.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    @ngarayeva001 Very vegan? Should I now ask you whether or not you know how (or from what) exactly hydrolysed silk proteins are made? Sure, some producers do use silk as raw material...
  • ngarayeva001ngarayeva001 Member
    edited July 2019
    @Pharma, I couldn’t find much. I thought they just collect silk worms cocoons and hydrolyze it... What is actually used? In fact I have a couple of animal derived ingredients but for example I would never be ok to apply sheep sebum on my lips or animal fat on my skin. Not a fan of snail slime either. Just a personal preference.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Standard hydrolysed silk protein is made from what's left after the cocoons have been used for harvesting silk. Notably, the cocoons are collected before the butterflies hatch so that one can obtain one single long fibre instead of chewed-through fragments. Hence, silk protein is often just the innermost layer of "filthy" silk plus the dried larvae which make up most of the weight. It should be called hydrolysed silk worm protein instead.
  • I have just threw away my silk proteins ? I never liked this ingredient anyway. It smells dreadfully. I just bought it because I like trying new things and silk sounds good (although I was aware it’s a claim ingredient). I have my buzzword label: I am a vegan skincare formulator now, and the fact I never say no to bacon doesn’t change anything ?
    Jokes aside, the majority of great ingredients are synthetic or petroleum derived anyway.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    edited July 2019
    I can't remember which brand it was that uses real silk for hydrolysis (probably Shiseido or Kanebo/Sensai)... I wonder why silk peptides should be any good. I prefer pure amino acids and these are usually derived either from plants or petrochemistry. If you choose wisely, these AAs don't smell once in solution and have real nice humectant activity (and are cheaper than silk).
  • Do you mean that they are called ‘silk amino acids’ but derived from plants or petrochemicals? I will have a look at sensai and shiseido products to see which one uses silk. I used to use both brands before started making my own skincare. But I am pretty certain that the stinky mess I had was made exactly from worms because it smelled like someone died.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Naw, I'm not using silk amino acids but just plain pure amino acids, nothing to do with silk ;) .
  • Royal Jelly will darken over time owing to the maillard reaction. You will need to work around this.
Sign In or Register to comment.