"Creamy Balms"

Hi

Im wondering how some lip balms get the "creamy" texture. Whenever I have used shea with beeswax (even smaller amounts), my balms are solid balms and not a "creamy" texture.  Do we need to whip the material to get a "creamy" look. Or is there an ingredient that someone can recommend.  The balms currently is just plain olive oil, avacodo oil, jojoba, beeswax and shea butter.

Ive tried different concentrations of each ingredient but just cant reach the creamy texture.  

Any help appreciated.

Thanks
Myra

Comments

  • Please post the formula, it's impossible to tell anything without looking at your ingredients and %. Also, can elaborate the meaning of "creamy" look/texture. What is creamy for me might be stiff for you. It would be better if you can provide your benchmark.
  • ZafZaf Member
    As per my personal experience, your problem might be the Shea first of all. All the soft plant butters (Shea, mango, ect) are a little unstable. To my understanding this is because of the ratios of waxes and fatty acids (ect?), which like to separate. They're very sensitive to temperature change (specifically gradual changes, and do much better with quick temp changes - like putting the whole thing in the freezer for an hour or two and then bringing it out and letting it naturally come back to room temp).
    I've had so much problem with lip balms I've basically given up on that respects (either two stiff and don't melt properly, or too soft and start separating). And with soft plant butters I treat them very gently and whip them slowly. Not super helpful with something that has a wax component.

    Hope that helps (I know, it probably doesn't).
  • Checked on online stores you will find varieties there a lot. 
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @myraqureshi

    You're referring to a whipped balm.  Heat your waxes, butters, oils to make a homogeneous liquid.  Add 3% Tapioca Starch while rapidly stirring the mixture to get an even distribution.  When the mixture cools down and begins to solidify, whip it with a whisk attachment at very high speed.  This will introduce air into the mix and the Tapioca Starch will hold the whipped texture.  Continue whipping until cooled to room temp.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Molly_CuleMolly_Cule Member
    edited August 2019
    You can substitute shea with cocoa butter... but again your formula's % are needed :)  
  • GeneGene Member
    @myraqureshi

    You're referring to a whipped balm.  Heat your waxes, butters, oils to make a homogeneous liquid.  Add 3% Tapioca Starch while rapidly stirring the mixture to get an even distribution.  When the mixture cools down and begins to solidify, whip it with a whisk attachment at very high speed.  This will introduce air into the mix and the Tapioca Starch will hold the whipped texture.  Continue whipping until cooled to room temp.
    Do you know if this holds up in stability?
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Since it's primarily Shea Butter it's going to melt in high heat.  I did ship some in July from Texas to California and it did not melt.  But, if you want it to hold the whipped texture, best to not ship this type of product during the summer months.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
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