Gluten-free certification for cosmetics? Is it a thing and how much is it?

I had a customer with celiac disease ask if our product was gluten free as she would develop hypersensitivity reactions if it did.

Any way to get certified?

Comments

  • She shouldn't eat her cosmetics then.

    Dermatitis herpetiformis
    Topical or intradermal application of gluten is not sufficient to trigger typical DH lesions, demonstrating that the development of this disease involves intestinal exposure to gluten.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4230654/
  • A reference to a dermatology book in Portuguese that's not available online doesn't convince me topical gluten sensitivity is impossible, I'm not claiming it's common but I don't think that enough to rule it out.

    Jacques CMC. Ramos-e-Silva M, Castro MCR. Fundamentos de Dermatologia. Rio de Janeiro: Atheneu; 2009. Dermatite herpetiforme e dermatose por IgA Linear; pp. 653–658. [Google Scholar]

    There's some anecdotal evidence hinting to the possibility: 

    "...it is my clinical experience that several patients with celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis have reported reactions to what appears to be topical exposure to gluten (or air-borne in the case of hair spray) in body care products and that this reaction resolved once they stopped using the gluten-containing product. We do not know for certain if it was a gluten-containing ingredient or some other ingredient that caused the reaction, or if the product was tested for gluten. However, each of us knows our own body best. I support my patients who follow a gluten-free diet in selecting cosmetics free of gluten, in particular lip products and hair and face lotion, should they choose to do so."

    https://nationalceliac.org/celiac-disease-questions/using-gluten-free-skin-body-products-someone-celiac-disease/

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Dermal reaction to certain cereals is more likely a common allergy rather than coeliac disease although the latter may be so severe and persisting for so long (because of non-cereal-abstinent nutrition) that antibodies are built against cereal proteins. Though this scenario is hypothetical, involves to a lot of bad luck, and likely requires some type of skin issue as well.
    Or it's an imaginary reaction or, especially in kids, a pseudo-allergy.
  • Pharma said:
    Dermal reaction to certain cereals is more likely a common allergy rather than coeliac disease although the latter may be so severe and persisting for so long (because of non-cereal-abstinent nutrition) that antibodies are built against cereal proteins. Though this scenario is hypothetical, involves to a lot of bad luck, and likely requires some type of skin issue as well.
    Or it's an imaginary reaction or, especially in kids, a pseudo-allergy.

    These days some folks take gluten intolerance to another level and some love to diax themselves.

    Zink said:
    A reference to a dermatology book in Portuguese that's not available online doesn't convince me topical gluten sensitivity is impossible, I'm not claiming it's common but I don't think that enough to rule it out.

    Jacques CMC. Ramos-e-Silva M, Castro MCR. Fundamentos de Dermatologia. Rio de Janeiro: Atheneu; 2009. Dermatite herpetiforme e dermatose por IgA Linear; pp. 653–658. [Google Scholar]

    There's some anecdotal evidence hinting to the possibility: 

    "...it is my clinical experience that several patients with celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis have reported reactions to what appears to be topical exposure to gluten (or air-borne in the case of hair spray) in body care products and that this reaction resolved once they stopped using the gluten-containing product. We do not know for certain if it was a gluten-containing ingredient or some other ingredient that caused the reaction, or if the product was tested for gluten. However, each of us knows our own body best. I support my patients who follow a gluten-free diet in selecting cosmetics free of gluten, in particular lip products and hair and face lotion, should they choose to do so."

    https://nationalceliac.org/celiac-disease-questions/using-gluten-free-skin-body-products-someone-celiac-disease/

    Nothing is 100% impossible and you never know if some people might eat their moisturizers.

    Gluten-free is interesting market, but is it big nuff to invest in, you will have to decide urself. 

    Any way to get certified? - In my little knowledge, there's https://gfco.org/about-us/ certification for cosmetics.
    Don't know how much is it tho.  

  • Definitely convinced it's not worth the effort by now.. 
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